West Africa Outbreak: Get the Facts on the Ebola Virus

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Ebola West Africa
(Image Source: http://pbs.twimg.com)
Ebola West Africa
The Ebola Facts website has been designed in such a way that it gives a simple understanding of how the virus spreads, its symptoms, and most importantly – how to protect yourself. (Image Source: http://pbs.twimg.com)

West Africa has been hit hard by an outbreak of the Ebola virus. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 57 new deaths have occurred up until July 27 in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. This has brought the total death toll to 729. The WHO says the total number of Ebola cases now exceeds 1,300.

According to ebolafacts.com the disease is what scientists call a hemorrhagic fever – it operates by making its victims bleed from almost anywhere on their body. Usually, victims bleed to death from Ebola.

Get the facts!
The Ebola Facts website has been designed in such a way that it gives a simple understanding of how the virus spreads, its symptoms, and most importantly – how to protect yourself. To obtain a better insight into the disease be sure to take in as much information from the ebola facts website.

What is happening in Africa?
“Ebola is worsening in West Africa,” said Dr. Tom Friedan, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “This is a tragic, painful, dreadful, merciless virus and it’s the largest, most complex outbreak that we know of in history.” This is according to thestar.com.


Additionally, this is the first time the virus has caused an outbreak in West Africa and on Friday, the World Health Organisation’s director general will be meeting with presidents from the affected countries to launch a $100 million (U.S.) response plan. The WHO is also calling for “several hundred more personnel” — everyone from doctors and nurses to epidemiologists and data managers — to be deployed to the region.

According to reports, Liberia and Sierra Leone have declared a state of emergency and are said to be implementing quarantine measures because, “extraordinary challenges require extraordinary measures,” according to Sierra Leonean President Ernest Bai Koroma.

According to cbc.ca, Patrick Sawyer, the first recorded case of Ebola in Nigeria, took an Asky flight that stopped in Ghana and Togo, raising questions over how a person whose sister had died of the disease three weeks before was able to board an international flight.

Kyei Faried, deputy director in charge of disease control, told a news conference that authorities had a list of 11 passengers who disembarked from Sawyer’s flight and were monitoring them. The government is considering whether to ban flights from affected countries.

An Ebola outbreak can devastate families and communities, but the infection can be controlled through the use of recommended protective measures in clinics and hospitals, at community gatherings, or at home.

 

 

 

 

Darryl Linington