MENU

Opera launches a new browser

April 3, 2019 • Online & Social

Opera Vintage makes use of the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine to service pages slowly, enriched by sound effects and a four tab limit.

Opera Vintage makes use of the IAWM to service pages slowly, enriched by sound effects and a four tab limit.

Opera, the Norwegian browser developer has announced Opera Vintage, a new browser that will provide users with exclusive access to their favourite websites from the last millennium in a way that prioritizes feeling over functionality. It’s bulky but robust design give users a unique experience browsing their favourite old websites.

With this addition to its product portfolio, Opera becomes the first major browser with a unique offer for Web 1, Web 2 and Web 3 lovers.

“Our research has revealed that some people simply can’t keep up with products and services getting better and smoother, richer and more beautiful,” says Jørgen Arnesen, Global Head of Marketing and Distribution. “With Opera Vintage, we are taking a leap backward in time to allow people to experience a world they feel more in control of.”

Opera Vintage will only be able to load pages as they existed pre-2000 through the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine (IAWM). When starting the browser, it will suspend all system processes for 40 seconds while playing sound effects inspired by classic modems, a feature we found especially popular among people who declared having used early versions of Gecko-based browsers. Opera Vintage will also incorporate a Multiple Document Interface (MDI), a feature inspired from Opera 1.0 that allows users to open up to four tabs in one window, a feature today only relevant for the web of the last millennium.

A slower web experience

Opera Vintage loads websites up to 10 times slower than modern versions of Opera, giving people more time to enjoy the activities they love the most while waiting for their old websites to load.

“We believe that the Internet has gotten too fast and is just too great to use,” said Arnesen. “By slowing down the browser, we will allow people to spend quality time to tasks like knitting or fetching coffee while waiting for web pages to load.”

A legacy web reduces privacy concerns

In the last decade, the current Web, often referred to as “Web 2,” has caused major concerns about privacy and security among Internet users by making the web an interactive experience full of dynamic, user-shared content. Opera Vintage fixes these problems by reverting to a static version of the web, where users simply view fixed pages. With such a solution at their fingertips, Opera give users a tool that guarantees them total control of their digital lives.

“Twenty years ago, your online privacy was mostly just a theoretical issue,” said Arnesen. “By only having support for legacy versions of websites, we dramatically reduced the need for advanced browser privacy features like VPN and ad blocker.”

Availability

Opera Vintage is not available for download at Opera.com. To obtain your copy, please contact our company by mailing a letter to Opera Software AS, P.O. Box 4214 Nydalen, NO-0401 Oslo, Norway.

Edited by Fundisiwe Maseko
Follow Fundisiwe Maseko on Twitter
Follow IT News Africa on Twitter

Comments

comments


Comments are closed.

« »