Windows 10 is Being Retired – What We Know About Windows 11

Sourced from The Sun UK.

Windows 10 Home and Pro are set to be retired on 14 October 2025, no doubt as a harbinger to the launch of Windows 11. Pro Educations and Pro for Workstations versions of the OS are also included in the date.

This comes according to Microsoft’s official Windows 10 life cycle page, however, this information doesn’t appear to be new. A PC Magazine article from 2015 reflects that Windows 10 has been slated to be retired in 2025 since the year of its release.

This is in line with Microsoft’s policy on operating systems – 5 years mainstream support followed by another 10 years of extended support.

It is worth noting that Microsoft has occasionally kept supporting its operating systems past previously announced retirement dates – probably because enough users continue to work on the systems past the dates.

If Microsoft does indeed keep to the date then all security updates and development patches for Windows 10 will cease completely in 2025. Tom’s Hardware presumes that Windows 10 Enterprise and any Windows servers using Windows 10 will continue to be supported after 2025 because of their usage in the enterprise and prosumer markets.

Windows 11?

Windows has an event booked for June 24 where the future of its PC operating system will be discussed. It is likely they may begin announcing information about Windows 11 at the event.

Microsoft has previously stated that Windows 10 will be the last version of the Windows OS, however recent clues, including teases from Microsoft point to the soon-to-be-announced Windows 11.

Currently, there are around 1.3-billion active devices running Windows 10. If Microsoft announces their new OS this year, it will allow PC owners to 3 – 4 years to migrate to the new version of Windows.

The 24 June event is scheduled for 11 am ET in the US. A possible tease for the new OS’ announcement, though a nebulous one at best.

The Windows logo in the tweeted GIF used to promote the event is also lacking the horizontal bars of the “window” in its shadow. Another possible tease for the number “11”.

Windows Sun Valley

Microsoft also recently accidentally revealed that it has been working on a new version of Windows in a support document too, with Windows Latest reporting on June 9 that the document offered to teach readers “about managing applications in Windows 10 and Windows Sun Valley.”

If Microsoft is renaming its OS and moving away from a numbered system, it will track with its previous announcements of Windows 10 being the last Windows OS as we know it.

Windows Sun Valley would be a breath of fresh air for Microsoft who have numbered its OS since its very first system, Windows 1.0.

UPDATE: Windows 11 has leaked online, revealing changes to Start Menu and Interface.

By Luis Monzon
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