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John McCain: Zuckerberg made North Africa revolutions possible

March 4, 2011 • Mobile and Telecoms, Top Stories

Mark Zuckerberg, credited with enabling the North African revolutions in early 2011 (Image: Wikipedia)

Mark Zuckerberg, the creator of Facebook, made the revolutions in North Africa possible, American Senator John McCain said at the Brookings Institute on Thursday after returning from a trip to the region.

He added that Zuckerberg was the most popular person in the Middle East as a result of the importance of Facebook in organizing people to the streets.

“This social networking cannot be underestimated in how all of these events, really the driving force in how all of this transformed and took place,” McCain said in his comments.

McCain and fellow senator Joseph Lieberman both participated in the discussion at the Wasthington-based institute following their trip to the region and a way to inform public discussion of the ongoing unrest in the MENA region.

Lieberman said that the changes, “Even more consequential than the collapse of the Soviet Union” and suggested, “It’s in our strategic interest at this moment to help history move in the right direction.”

Further emphasizing the role technology played in Egypt, McCain told of a story he heard from a young man while in Egypt, who held up his blackberry and said, “I can get 200,000 people in the square in two hours.”

“Egypt is the heart and soul of the Arab world,” McCain said. “What happens in Egypt will be vital to what happens in the rest of the region.”

By Joseph Mayton

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2 Responses to John McCain: Zuckerberg made North Africa revolutions possible

  1. [...] Facebook video/ web TV service does not exist at the moment but it is likely to do so in the near future and [...]

  2. [...] Facebook for its role in aiding the North African revolutions underway.  [see for example:   http://www.itnewsafrica.com/2011/03/john-mccain-zuckerberg-made-north-africa-revolutions-possible/ ]   Could social media play a role in the United States in promoting significant and lasting [...]

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