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EASSy cable lands in Tanzania

April 9, 2010 • Top Stories

EASSy cable is getting closer to completion after the undersea cable, delivering 1.4 Terabits per second of capacity, landed on 6 April in Tanzania, Msasani Peninsula.

The ship laying 5000km long undersea fibre optic cable for The East Africa Submarine Cable System arrived on Tuesday night, 6 April, on the Tanzanian shore and started the cable laying process the following morning, according to Tanzanian Daily News.

“Interconnection with other undersea international cable systems will enable traffic on EASSy to seamlessly connect to Europe, North and South America, the Middle East and Asia, thereby enhancing the east coast of Africa’s connectivity to the global telecommunications network”, said West Indian Ocean Cable Company Chief Executive Officer, Chriss Wood, present at the landing site.

The EASSy cable has landing points in 9 African countries and provides a backhaul system for at least 12 landlocked countries, enabling wide coverage in the East African region.

In Tanzania, Zantel and TTCL have invested in the project, assuming responsibility for selling and distributing capacity to other network operators and internet service providers.

According to Moncef Mettiji, Zantel CTO, the cable is expected to revolutionize Internet technology and provide high speed connectivity in the country.

“EASSy is a critical element in Zantel’s strategy to improve communications and broaden access to information throughout Tanzania and neighbouring countries, thereby enriching lives and supporting business growth”, said Mettiji.

The East African Submarine System (EASSy) comprises of a 10,000km submarine cable system along the east coast of Africa, with 9 landing stations in Sudan, Djibouti, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania, Comoros, Madagascar, Mozambique and South Africa.

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3 Responses to EASSy cable lands in Tanzania

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  2. The ship laying 5000km long undersea fibre optic cable & capacity 1.4 Terabits per second.
    Wow.

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